Autumn course available: SOC 401 – Microfoundations of Social Change

If you are still looking for upper division sociology electives to take in autumn 2014, be sure to consider signing up for SOC 401: Microfoundations of Social Change.  For those of you wondering “what in the world does ‘microfoundations of social change’ mean?” this course explores the individual-level and interaction-based forces that guide the tides of social change.  See the following course description:

“This course will explore a broad range of theoretical arguments about the microfoundations of action, including instrumental rationality, values, emotions, habits, identities, frames, and schemas. Since this topic is necessarily interdisciplinary, we will be reading work in psychology, economics, political science, anthropology, and biology, in addition to sociology. The main goal of the course is to provide a broad overview of the full range of arguments about the microfoundations of action, and thus of social change, ranging from cultural sociology at the most macro level to neurobiology at the most micro. The focus will be more on contemporary than on classical theories, and (since the scope of the course is so broad) more on summaries of literatures rather than specialized research.”

The only required textbook for this course is Daniel Kahneman’s “Thinking Fast and Slow” – a New York Times bestseller and National Academy of Sciences Best Book Award winner that explores how people have reactions, make judgments and choices, engage in recognition, and draw conclusions.

Only four out of 25 available seats are filled!  Sign up now!

Additional information is below:

Course title: SOC 401 – Microfoundations of Social Change

Instructor: Edgar Kiser

Schedule: T/Th 1:30-3:20

SLN: 20502

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Classes. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s