Great summer VLPA+W course: English 200B: Immigrant/Transitional Fictions (A term)

ENGL 200 B,  “Immigrant/Transnational Fictions,” is a VLPA and W course offered summer A-term,  M-Th,  noon-2:10, SLN 11347.   

 

This course is dedicated to reading and writing about works of fiction that explore the global movement of people in a time when migratory flows are increasingly met with resistance and persecution.  Reading, discussion and writing in this class will engage this process of movement, what sacrifices are required, what restrictions are imposed, and what transformations might occur.  We will explore the ways in which these fictional works engage the challenges of daily life to enrich our understanding of the struggles encountered by others who seek to preserve a sense of self in the absence of familiar frames of reference or forms of support.  While being recognized is a powerful desire, it often conflicts with the fear of exposure, just as the pull of nostalgia competes with the embrace of new possibilities.  Texts: Signs Preceding the End of the World, by Yuri Herrera; Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue; Exit West by Mohsin Hamid 

Questions?  Contact the instructor John O’Neill: joneill@uw.edu

A few comments from students who took this course last summer: 

    • “As someone who comes from an immigrant family, I have never read novels of global migration, and it was nice to finally have that exposure, especially in a time like this.” 
    • “The way the instructor lead class discussion is very inclusive.  He makes everyone feel like their comment/idea matters.”   
    • “I found I learned a lot about my style in addition to how different each person’s critical eye acts.  The themes of these books also gave some better life understanding.”

“John, thank you so much for a great class.  I have always loved English (even as a Science student) and you truly amplified my appreciation of literature.  Thank you also for your kindness, patience and feedback.”

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