Calling all Community Service Rockstars! DUE FRIDAY (5/26) **TOMORROW**

Are you or one of your fellow students a community service rock star?

Do you enjoy large sums of money?

Are you also graduating this year?

Apply for the Albert W. Black Undergraduate Community Service Internship Award!

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DUE (except the letters of recommendation) BY:

Friday, May 26th, 2017 @ 5:00 PM to 203 Savery Hall

Ask your recommenders to email their letters directly to Susanna (susanna@uw.edu) by May 26th

This is a merit based award for undergraduate Sociology majors who volunteer with Puget Sound area community service organizations that work with or provide support for disadvantaged populations. This award acknowledges the positive role of volunteerism on the local community. Volunteer work for which a student DOES NOT receive financial or academic compensation is the strongest demonstration of a candidate’s commitment to their community and is consistent with the spirit of Dr. Black’s own community work and civic service. 

The 2017 Award amount will be $1,000

(no strings attached! Spend as you please!)

Please note that this is a SELF NOMINATED award. 

All candidates are reviewed by the Department’s Undergraduate Program Committee which makes its recommendations to the Chair. The award winner is recognized during the Department’s Graduation Celebration in Meany Hall on Wednesday evening June 7th, 2017.

To learn more about the award and the self-nomination process and application, please read the full instructions here: Updated 2017 Al Black Community Service Award Information

Materials to submit (full details and coversheet available at the link above): 

  1. Cover page with a) your name and student number b) UW email address c) phone number d) internship location/title of project e) names and affiliations of your letter writers (see below)
  2. Narrative (2 pages max)
  3. Copy of UW unofficial transcript
  4. One high resolution photo of yourself in .jpg format
  5. Three letters of recommendation a) one faculty member from Sociology b) one from your supervisor/mentor at the social service organization where you volunteer or uncompensated internship is based c) one from a person of your choosing

If you have any questions regarding the award or your self-nomination, we’d love to talk more with you about it! Please email Susanna Hansson directly at susanna@uw.edu.

Posted in Awards, Career Development, Community Involvement, Department Announcements, Recent Graduates, Sociology Dept. Event, Student Life, Uncategorized, Volunteer Opportunity | Leave a comment

Calling all Community Service Rock Stars!

Are you or one of your fellow students a Community Service rock star?

Do you know someone who is deeply involved in community service projects and who is graduating this year?

Encourage them to apply for the Albert W. Black Undergraduate Community Service Internship Award!

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A great many Sociology undergraduate students believe strongly in the importance of Community Service and we are often very surprised by the high level of commitment to community service our majors exhibit.

The Albert W. Black Undergraduate Community Service Award is intended to celebrate that commitment and honor a 2016/2017 graduating Sociology major. The award is intended for a student serving as a volunteer or participating in an internship with a Puget Sound area community service organization working with disadvantaged populations that’s having a positive impact on the local community.

Any graduating Sociology major may submit materials to become a candidate for the award. The 2017 Award amount will be $1,000. Please note that this is a SELF NOMINATED award. 

All candidates are reviewed by the Department’s Undergraduate Program Committee which makes its recommendations to the Chair. The award winner is recognized during the Department’s Graduation Celebration in Meany Hall on Wednesday evening June 7th, 2017.

To learn more about the award and the self-nomination process and application, please read the full instructions here: 2017 Al Black Community Service Award Information

If you have question regarding the award or your self-nomination, we’d love to talk more with you about it! Please schedule an advising appointment by emailing asksoc@uw.edu, and mention you’re meeting to discuss the award.


— Award Background–

5.0.2Albert W. Black, Jr. (B.S., University of Michigan, 1963; M.A., Wayne State University, 1968; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1976) is an Emeritus Principal Lecturer in the Department of Sociology. His areas of interest are the sociology of religion and race relations. Dr. Black is a past president of the National Association of Black Sociologists and the recipient of a Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Washington. He has been an instructor in the Bridge Program, which aids in transitioning freshman student athletes into university academic culture.

Al Black is a highly respected leader and role model in the local community. His legendary commitment to community service, in particular his work with gang members, gained him the Central Area Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Community Service Award in 1996. As a founding member and Chair of the Franklin Fathers Group, he has led interventions into local schools with other mostly African American men, and challenged the at-risk students with a message of zero tolerance for the disruption of the learning process. He has been invited into numerous school and civic environments as mentor, educator, leader and parent.

Posted in Awards, Career Development, Clubs/Organizations, Community Involvement, Department Announcements, Fellowships, Scholarships, Sociology Dept. Event, Student Life, Uncategorized, Volunteer Opportunity | Leave a comment

HAPPENING NOW: SUMMER BLOG-A-THON

There are so many new and exciting Summer Sociology Courses! But how do I learn more about them? How do I pick which one(s) to register for?!

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Summer quarter will feature several new and exciting Sociology courses that we can’t wait to share with you!

In order to provide you with information on each course, we’ve decided to host our second-ever…

Sociology Department Blog-A-Thon!

Each day THIS week we will feature a different Sociology course right here on the SOC blog. This means that instead of having just one weekly blog posting, you’ll get five! Woohoo!

Each post will feature a beautiful course poster, details on the class, and the SLN for easy registration! 

The Summer Blog-a-thon is happening now! Scroll down to see all the amazing courses!

Posted in Classes, Department Announcements, Sociology Dept. Event, Summer Opportunities, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Cap & Gown Pick up Starts Next Week

REMINDER!

If you’re walking in the 2017 Spring Commencement Ceremony for the Sociology Department and/or the University (Husky Stadium) Ceremony, you must wear a cap & gown.

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Cap & gown order pick up starts next week! 

May 30 – June 3

You can pick up your online order at Husky Stadium from 11:00 am to 7:00 pm

Note: The specific date you pick up was selected when you placed your order online.

 

Posted in Campus Event, Department Announcements, Graduation/Commencement, Sociology Dept. Event, Student Life, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Summer Course: History of Capitalism

Looking for a fun course to take this summer?

Consider HSTAA 490: The History of Capitalism, offered by the History Department!

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HSTAA 490: History of Capitalism (5) (I&S)

Instructor: Michael B. Reagan

Full Term: MW 10:50 to 1:00 pm in SAV 260

SLN: 14503

What is capitalism? It defines our world, yet until recently it has not be the focus of historical study. This seminar course offers a broad overview of American capitalism from colonial times up to the present. It introduces students to the transformation of America from a rural colonial outpost of the British Empire to the largest industrially developed economic power in the world, and the more recent turn toward neoliberal policies in the late 20th century. The course will consider the political, social, cultural, legal, moral, and environmental dimensions of American life – with a particular focus on the varieties of American capitalism, how the picture looks different through the analysis of race, class and gender. This is a history “from the bottom, all the way to the top.” All together it hopes to provide a picture of the historical characteristics and dynamics of American capitalism.

Assignments and grading are as follows: One take home final, one in class midterm, and three “micro essays” on readings from class.

 

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SOC Blog-A-Thon Day 5: SOC 230

SOC 230: Racial & Ethnic Health Disparities

SUM 17 SOC 230
Course Overview: 
  • Instructor: Savannah Larimore (shlarimo@uw.edu)
  • Schedule: FULL TERM; MW 12:40 – 2:10
  • SLN: 13528
  • 5 credits (Individuals & Society, Diversity)
  • This course will satisfy five credits of the Sociology Elective requirement

This course critically examines health and health care disparities among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. It utilizes sociological, demographic, epidemiological and psychological concepts to introduce students to health disparities research and contemporary debates in this interdisciplinary field of study. Students will learn about health indicators across population groups and explore theories used to understand gaps and discrepancies in healthcare between and among populations. In particular, the course will examine the ways in which multiple forms of interpersonal and institutional discrimination, neighborhood and community factors, and inequalities in socioeconomic status influence health behaviors, access to health care services and health status outcomes across racial and ethnic groups. Students will learn how to communicate ideas about the social causes and solutions to health inequalities in the United States as well as create policy recommendations that address some of the many shortcomings of modern American healthcare.

Posted in Classes, Department Announcements, Sociology Dept. Event, Summer Opportunities, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

[SOC in the News]: UW Sociology’s Tim Thomas Interviewed on KUOW

UW Sociology Department Grad Student Tim Thomas was interviewed about his research on KUOW! 

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The following is an excerpt from an article published on KUOW by Carolyn Adolph on 5/13/17…

Black life is draining out of Seattle, Census Shows

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“South King County has long been a place where people with modest incomes could find a home. Now more people are coming, driven by high rents in Seattle. And a University of Washington researcher has found that African-Americans are among the most affected by this wave of displacement.

Tim Thomas of the University of Washington discovered the trend while digging deep into Census data.

“There’s this massive shift of African-Americans in Seattle moving away from where opportunity or higher-income areas are,” Thomas said.

Rising rents have driven African-Americans from the neighborhoods they were forced into originally by housing policies that targeted them. Now they are being forced to move on. It’s a migration of historic proportions: Thomas’s maps show a strong migration of poor people heading south in 2010, which grew stronger by 2015. The maps also show African-American life draining out of Seattle and dispersing south, to cities like Renton, Kent and Auburn.

“You see the migration of race as well as the migration of poverty,” he said. “This massive shift of African-Americans moving south — that’s a big story.”

But as many of the displaced discover, rents at their destinations in south King County have also been rising, adding to the pressure and narrowing the escape route…”

You can listen to the full interview or read the full article by clicking here!

Tim Thomas is a UW Ph.D. Candidate in the Sociology Department. His fields of interest focus on demography, migration, neighborhoods, race and ethnicity, social mobility, social stratification/inequality, and urban studies.

Posted in Community Involvement, Sociology in the News, Student Life, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

[SOC in the News]: How to Talk to your Professor

The following is an excerpt from an article posted by the New York Times, written by Molly Worthen on 5/13/17…

You Can’t Talk to Ur Professor Like This

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Formal manners and titles aren’t elitist. They ensure respect for everyone.

“…At the start of my teaching career, when I was fresh out of graduate school, I briefly considered trying to pass myself off as a cool professor. Luckily, I soon came to my senses and embraced my true identity as a young fogey.

After one too many students called me by my first name and sent me email that resembled a drunken late-night Facebook post, I took a very fogeyish step. I began attaching a page on etiquette to every syllabus: basic rules for how to address teachers and write polite, grammatically correct emails.

Over the past decade or two, college students have become far more casual in their interactions with faculty members. My colleagues around the country grumble about students’ sloppy emails and blithe informality….

Sociologists who surveyed undergraduate syllabuses from 2004 and 2010 found that in 2004, 14 percent addressed issues related to classroom etiquette; six years later, that number had more than doubled, to 33 percent. This phenomenon crosses socio-economic lines. My colleagues at Stanford gripe as much as the ones who teach at state schools, and students from more privileged backgrounds are often the worst offenders.

Why are so many teachers bent out of shape because a student fails to call them “Professor” or neglects to proofread an email? Are academics really that insecure? Is this just another case of scapegoating millennials for changes in the broader culture?…”

Read the full article on The New York Times here! 

Posted in Career Development, Sociology in the News, Student Life, Training, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

**TOMORROW!**Undergraduate Research Symposium!

Are you interested in research? How about seeing what your peers have been up to in their classes this year? Then you should come to…

The UW Undergraduate Research Symposium! THIS FRIDAY, May 19th! 

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THIS Friday is the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium where a set of our very own sociology undergraduates are presenting posters and giving talks at sessions! Scroll down to see all the students involved and learn more about their projects! The symposium is a great place to learn how sociology students are conducting research in our department. Come say hi, get some inspiration, and consider showing your own research next year! You can view the full schedule and more details here.

The Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium is a chance for undergraduates to present what they have learned through their research experiences to a larger audience. The Symposium provides a forum for students, faculty, and the community to discuss cutting edge research topics and to examine the connection between research and education. The Symposium includes poster and presentation sessions by students from all academic disciplines and all three UW campuses, plus invited guests.

Sociology Poster Presentations at the Mary Gates Undergraduate Research Symposium

Inspiration Porn and Down Syndrome – Promoting Inclusion or Reinforcing Stereotypes?

  • Presenter
    • Lauren Marie (Lauren) Halle, Senior, Sociology UW Honors Program
  • Mentor
    • Heather D. Evans, Disability Studies, Sociology
  • Session

The Impact of Destination on Access to Healthcare for Immigrants in the United States

  • Presenter
    • Amy Elizabeth (Amy) Christison, Senior, Sociology UW Honors Program
  • Mentors
    • Katherine Stovel, Sociology
    • Hedwig Lee, Sociology
  • Session

Evaluating Risks and Rewards of Prospects in Major League Baseball

  • Presenter
    • Johnathan M. Hsu, Senior, Sociology
  • Mentor
    • Emilio Zagheni, Sociology
  • Session

Impact of Video Exposure to Fatal Police Violence on Black Males

The Push and Pull of Capitol Hill: An Examination of Gentrification, Acceptance, and Other Social Factors Shape Movement of LGBTQ+ People Out of Seattle’s Historic Gayborhood

Meet Your Neighbors: Experiences of Homelessness in a Gentrifying Neighborhood

Disadvantage and Crime in United States Neighborhoods: The Impact of Neighborhood Clustering

  • Presenter
    • Kathryn (Katie) Reynolds, Junior, Sociology UW Honors Program
  • Mentors
    • Kyle Crowder, Sociology
    • Robert Crutchfield, Sociology
    • Hedy Lee, Sociology
  • Session

Immigration as a Benefit to Mental Health: Understanding the Mechanisms Behind the Epidemiological Paradox

  • Presenter
    • Rachel Marion Sanders, Senior, Sociology, Biology (General) UW Honors Program
  • Mentor
    • René Flores, Sociology
  • Session

 

Posted in Campus Event, Career Development, Classes, Clubs/Organizations, Community Involvement, Department Announcements, Research Opportunities, Seminars, Sociology Dept. Event, Student Life, Training, Uncategorized, Workshops/Info Sessions | Leave a comment